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New technique can detect subtle breast cancer lesions

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in women worldwide. In recent years, doctors in New York and across the U.S. have become quite adept at detecting many forms of the disease. However, some breast tumors have characteristics that make them more difficult to diagnose.

Study finds doctor burnout to blame for many medical errors

New York residents who have experienced complications from medical errors may be interested to learn that according to a national survey, some of those errors could be a result of burnout. The survey asked approximately 6,700 physicians who worked in clinics and hospitals about workplace burnout, medical errors and workplace safety.

Some doctors are not prepared to diagnose diseases in women

The medical education provided to physicians and nurses in New York often fails to address gender-based differences in symptoms and disease. A 2016 survey of medical students revealed that less than half, 43.1 percent, received instruction about gender differences in medicine. The author of the study said that medical research and education still strongly focus on managing disease in males. Three-quarters of animal testing studies only involve male animals.

Patient matching errors the subject of letter to Congress

In 2009, the HITECH Act mandated the use of electronic health records by healthcare organizations. This has given rise to unique issues in patient matching and identification, however, which reportedly result in healthcare organizations losing billions of dollars each year in malpractice claims. In New York and across the U.S., patients have suffered from medication errors, wrong site surgery and other forms of malpractice on account of these issues.

Study finds condition causing vision loss often goes undiagnosed

Many New York residents are aware that their vision may decline as they age. To prevent this, many people regularly visit eye doctors or other trained eye care professionals to ensure that their eyes are still healthy. However, a study published in JAMA Opthalmology found that some eye care professionals were failing to diagnose a serious eye degeneration condition.

Mobile app helps prevent misdiagnosis

Misdiagnosis can be a major concern for New York patients, as studies indicate that around 5 percent of all patients across the country receive an incorrect diagnosis from their doctor each year. Some tools that are being developed to help decrease the chance of a mistaken diagnosis and improve accuracy include mobile apps that give doctors additional guidance and insight when ordering lab tests or making a diagnosis. Many of these apps are untested and do not have research to back up their use, but one study at Baylor College of Medicine examined PTT Advisor, an app created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Software can cut costs and reduce medical errors

Patients in New York may understand the consequences that a medical error can have. A study from the University of Colorado found that data entry errors were made by radiologists in up to 28 percent of ultrasound and DEXA reports. By having computer software enter the data, it could be possible to increase accuracy while saving up to $1 million in costs.

Misdiagnosis a major threat of medical malpractice

When people in New York enter the hospital, the last thing they want to think about is the danger of medical errors or a misdiagnosis. However, it can be important to keep the risk of a mistaken diagnosis in mind since diagnostic errors were the primary reason for medical malpractice claims being filed across the country between 2013 and 2017. In a report produced by a malpractice insurance company, statistics showed that a full one-third of all the claims that were made related to doctor or hospital error in diagnosing the patient.

More companies offering second opinion services to employees

More companies in New York and across the U.S. are offering second opinion services to their employees. These services cut down on misdiagnoses and reduce overall healthcare costs. According to data from the National Business Group on Health, 66 percent of companies now have second opinion services on their employee health care plans. In 2017, that number was only 47 percent.

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