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Death from medical mistakes a serious problem

In the 2018 midterm elections, many voters said that healthcare was their top priority when choosing a candidate. However, neither political party has put forth a plan that would reduce the number of deaths attributable to medical error. According to some reports, death by medical error is the third most likely cause in the United States, and there were probably 500 preventable deaths on election day by itself.

Molecular profile testing uncovers misdiagnoses of brain tumors

A global study on pediatric brain tumors that involved over 150 institutions revealed that traditional diagnostic methods often produced inaccurate diagnoses. For families in New York with children suffering from brain tumors, the study highlighted the importance of confirming a diagnosis with molecular profile testing.

ECRI lists top hazards stemming from health technology

The ECRI Institute has released its 2019 Top 10 Health Technology Hazards report. Addressing many of the hazards pointed out in the report will be of the highest priority to hospitals and medical centers in New York as it will help reduce the risk for patient injuries and deaths.

Learn more about LBD

About 1.4 million people in New York and throughout the country experience symptoms related to Lewy body dementia, or LBD. This can lead to problems moving or remembering people or events. However, since it presents symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease, it is not always diagnosed properly. There are many medical professionals who are not even aware that LBD exists. It is believed that a combination of genetic and other factors cause people to develop this condition.

ACT initiative launched to decrease misdiagnosis

Approximately every nine minutes in New York and across the United States, someone dies in a hospital due to receiving an incorrect medical diagnosis or delayed treatment. Though the statistics have improved over the years, an estimated 40,000 to 80,000 individuals currently die each year due to delayed treatment or misdiagnosed conditions. An additional 12 million people are affected by errors when being diagnosed, and an estimated 4 million of these individuals experience serious harm due to being misdiagnosed.

Prostate cancer metastasis could be misdiagnosed

A popular PET imaging method for determining what stage of prostate cancer a person is at may not be entirely accurate according to a study that appears in the September issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Some New York men may have undergone prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography imaging, which is used to identify the enzyme PMSA.

Late diagnosis of West Nile causes man to be paralyzed

New York residents should know that West Nile virus, a virus transmitted by mosquito bites, is a serious condition. Those infected by it will typically experience fevers, headaches, body tremors and sleepiness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that there is no specific antiviral treatment or vaccine for West Nile, but mild forms of the virus can be treated with over-the-counter pain medications or fever reducers.

X-ray developments designed to reduce errors, improve quality

Many people in New York expect to receive an X-ray when they have a potential broken bone or other problems. However, there has been a number of developments in X-ray technology that could substantially change the experience for many patients. X-rays were originally discovered at the end of the 19th century, and since that time, they have been used to see inside the human body, examine luggage contents at airports and even monitor buildings.

New technique can detect subtle breast cancer lesions

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in women worldwide. In recent years, doctors in New York and across the U.S. have become quite adept at detecting many forms of the disease. However, some breast tumors have characteristics that make them more difficult to diagnose.

Study finds doctor burnout to blame for many medical errors

New York residents who have experienced complications from medical errors may be interested to learn that according to a national survey, some of those errors could be a result of burnout. The survey asked approximately 6,700 physicians who worked in clinics and hospitals about workplace burnout, medical errors and workplace safety.

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