Brand

Free consultation
585-687-4425

Brand

Free consultation
585-687-4425

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety and in response to the recent COVID-19 safety measures, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via phone and video conferencing. We urge you to email or call our office to speak with us on how we can help you. We want you to know that we are here for you, and we will continue to meet our client’s needs, both new and existing, in the upcoming weeks.
Please reference the link below for a one-page factsheet from the CDC, which we find informative on the virus.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/2019-ncov-factsheet.pdf
Moto
motor vehicle
accidents
Truck
Trucking
Accidents
Medi
medical
malpractice
Cont
construction
accidents
Cata
catastrophic
injuries
Prem
premises
liability

4 reasons car accidents occur in school zones

| Mar 22, 2019 | Uncategorized

Whether or not you are a parent, you understand the importance of keeping children safe around their schools. After all, motor vehicles are significantly larger than school kids. If a car hits a child, the resulting injuries may be quite severe. 

While school zones keep kids safe, they are often hazardous for drivers. School zone accidents are not uncommon in New York. In fact, according to a recent study, the Empire State ranks 33rd in school zone traffic safety. When driving around a school, you must understand why accidents tend to occur in school zones. Here are the four most common reasons: 

1. Speed limit decreases 

In school zones, speed limits often decrease both significantly and rapidly. While slower speeds help keep children safe, sudden deceleration may contribute to accidents. The reverse is also true. If motorists fail to comply with posted speed limits, their reckless driving may cause a collision. 

2. Excessive pedestrian traffic 

On many roads, you do not have to contend with much pedestrian traffic. That usually is not the case with school zones, though. Excessive pedestrian traffic may cause other motorists to drive slower or more erratically. Unpredictable driving often leads to traffic accidents. 

3. Frequent stops 

In many school zones, crossing guards wait beside the road to help children and others cross safely. As such, you may have to stop in seemingly strange places during school hours. These frequent stops may increase your chances of a rear-end collision. 

4. Distracted driving 

Unfortunately, distracted driving does not only occur on highways and major roadways. That is, you can find distracted drivers virtually everywhere, including school zones. When motorists fail to pay attention to their vehicles, other drivers and pedestrians, they often cause dangerous conditions. 

What you do after a car accident matters. Still, many school zone accidents are avoidable. By understanding why automobile accidents often occur in school zones, you can better plan for staying safe around schools.

FindLaw Network
Fatal multi-vehicle crash causes three deaths

While driving is perhaps one of the most common behavior people across the country engage in, many New York residents do not realize that it is also one of the most dangerous activities they engage in. Millions lose their lives or become injured on American roadways...

What does Leandra’s Law do for victims of drunk drivers?

You often think of people in other cars getting hit and injured by drunk drivers. But even when a DWI car accident only involves one vehicle, innocent people can get hurt. Passengers, especially children, may not be able to avoid riding with an impaired driver,...

How do I prove someone else is at fault for causing a crash?

There are many reasons why someone might be involved in a car accident, but when that crash is caused by someone else, it can be especially frustrating. It means that regardless of how carefully one drives, they still rely on others to follow traffic safety rules and...

Evaluate My Case

Speak With One Of Our Attorneys Today About
Your Unique Situation.

Bradley Kammholz, Esq.

Meet Brad

JOSEPH A. ROSSI JR., ESQ.

Meet Joe